As America ages, senior care options flourish

6 Feb

Matthew Perrone of The Associated Press

About 10 million seniors currently rely on others for daily care, such as help getting dressed, preparing meals or taking medication. That number will only increase as more of the nation’s 78 million baby boomers enter old age. Nearly 7 in 10 people will need some form of long-term care after turning 65, according to the Georgetown University Public Policy Institute.

“Nobody wants to go to a nursing home, it’s the last resort,” says James Firman, president of the National Council on Aging. “People want to stay in their own home, and if they can’t, they want to go to a place where they can get assistance but that still feels homelike.”

Nursing homes are the most intensive form of long-term care, including round-the-clock medical supervision. That level of care comes with a steep price tag: the average cost of a semi-private room last year was $81,000, according to a survey by insurance provider MetLife. A private room ran more than $90,500.

Fortunately most seniors won’t require extended nursing home care. Only 5 percent will need five years or more in a nursing home.

Have a quick look at other senior care options here.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: