Tag Archives: elder care

YC-Backed Amulyte Is Building A Better Lifeline For Seniors On The Move | TechCrunch

19 Aug

YC-Backed Amulyte Is Building A Better Lifeline For Seniors On The Move | TechCrunch.

Amulyte isn’t the first startup to tackle the senior-sensing problem: Virginia-based BeClose pulled back the curtain on its own in-home monitoring system last year, while the team at Lively tried to crack the code by tracking objects around the house instead of people. Still, the pair have cooked up one of the few monitoring schemes that can keep tabs on seniors wherever they go, and opening up that backend to multiple caretakers means that loved ones and professionals always have access to the same information is an awfully smart move.

A Day in the Life of an Alzheimer’s Caregiver

15 Mar

Do you think you’ll be able to continue to handle him as he gets worse?

You don’t die from Alzheimer’s; you die from complications. And, physically, your dad is healthy. He’s probably going to be around a while. And that’s good. But he always said he never wanted to be this way. He always said, “If I end up a certain way, do something for me.”

via A Day in the Life of an Alzheimer’s Caregiver | VICE United States.

U.S. manages disease, not health – CNN.com

12 Mar

I have argued for years that we do not have a health care system in America. We have a disease-management system — one that depends on ruinously expensive drugs and surgeries that treat health conditions after they manifest rather than giving our citizens simple diet, lifestyle and therapeutic tools to keep them healthy.”

via U.S. manages disease, not health – CNN.com.

As America ages, senior care options flourish

6 Feb

Matthew Perrone of The Associated Press

About 10 million seniors currently rely on others for daily care, such as help getting dressed, preparing meals or taking medication. That number will only increase as more of the nation’s 78 million baby boomers enter old age. Nearly 7 in 10 people will need some form of long-term care after turning 65, according to the Georgetown University Public Policy Institute.

“Nobody wants to go to a nursing home, it’s the last resort,” says James Firman, president of the National Council on Aging. “People want to stay in their own home, and if they can’t, they want to go to a place where they can get assistance but that still feels homelike.”

Nursing homes are the most intensive form of long-term care, including round-the-clock medical supervision. That level of care comes with a steep price tag: the average cost of a semi-private room last year was $81,000, according to a survey by insurance provider MetLife. A private room ran more than $90,500.

Fortunately most seniors won’t require extended nursing home care. Only 5 percent will need five years or more in a nursing home.

Have a quick look at other senior care options here.